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Creative and Technical Photographic Art by Martin Klimas

September 20, 2012 4:25 PM

German photographer Martin Klimas is thinking so far outside the box that the box is but a dot to him. His unconventional techniques are not only original and technically challenging, but they’re so creative and well executed that the end result is simply stunning.

For his colourful series Sonic Sculptures, he wanted to see what music and sound looked like. He placed wet paint of different colours on top of a speaker element, turned the volume up, and fired away. After more than 1,000 shots, and countless hours spent in his Düsseldorf studio, he selected the best ones for the final presentation. The vibrations of the speaker had the paint flailing about in the most abstract way creating these unique images.
note: On his website, Klimas even lists which song was playing when each photo was taken!

High-speed photography, Sonic Sculptures by Martin Klimas

High-speed photography, Sonic Sculptures by Martin Klimas

High-speed photography, Sonic Sculptures by Martin Klimas

“In addition to the obvious debt owed to abstract expressionism, Klimas says his major influence was Hans Jenny, the father of cymatics, the study of wave phenomena.”

 
For the project called Ceramic Explosions, he simply relied on gravity to create the abstract art of smashed porcelain figurines. But it wasn’t that simple though. The process was — as usually in his case — very precise and technical. The figurines were dropped from an exact height of three meters, and he used a sound-sensitive trigger to fire the camera’s shutter. So the shot was automated in a way that when the pieces hit the ground smashing, the camera took a photo at exactly the right nanosecond to create these razor-sharp high-speed shots of shattered poses.

High-speed photography, Ceramic Explosions by Martin Klimas

High-speed photography, Ceramic Explosions by Martin Klimas

High-speed photography, Ceramic Explosions by Martin Klimas

“The porcelain statuette bursting into pieces isn’t what really captures the attention; the fascination lies in the genesis of a dynamic figure that replaces a static pose.”

 
The last series for today is called Birds of Prey. It’s not enough that these are stunning portraits of powerful creatures, that most nature photography enthusiasts can only dream about capturing. These images are “self portraits” in a way. As soon as the birds take flight inside the studio, they pass through a light beam sensor that triggers the shutter of Klimas’s precisely focused camera. Eliminating the natural surroundings, Klimas has the viewer focused on these birds in an isolated way, which makes these magnificent predators even cooler than normally.

High-speed photography, Birds of Prey by Martin Klimas

High-speed photography, Birds of Prey by Martin Klimas

High-speed photography, Birds of Prey by Martin Klimas

 
From gravity-induced porcelain splinter, to paint bouncing on a speaker element, and giant birds shooting their own self portraits, this guy has the full attention of the closet-nerd living inside me.

Source: Martin Klimas Photography
All photos © Martin Klimas


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