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Hong Kong in the Rain by Christophe Jacrot

Where I live, as in most of the Northern Hemisphere, autumn has come. And it’s been raining for days now. But that doesn’t necessary mean it’s a bad or depressing thing. I remembered a beautiful rainy set of pictures I’d stumbled upon earlier this year and thought it would be appropriate for this wet, cold, and dark part of the year. It’s called Hong Kong in the rain by French photographer and filmmaker Christophe Jacrot.

Jacrot isn’t exactly known for his “postcard cliché landscapes”. Quite the contrary, he manages to capture the beauty in the roughest of conditions, when most of us would rather get wrapped up under a blanket with a hot cup of tea.

“I like the way rain, snow and ‘bad weather’ awaken a feeling of romantic fiction within me”

Hong Kong in the Rain, by Christophe Jacrot

Hong Kong in the Rain, by Christophe Jacrot

Hong Kong in the Rain, by Christophe Jacrot

Hong Kong in the Rain, by Christophe Jacrot

Hong Kong in the Rain, by Christophe Jacrot

Hong Kong in the Rain, by Christophe Jacrot

Hong Kong in the Rain, by Christophe Jacrot

Hong Kong in the Rain, by Christophe Jacrot

Source & more pictures: christophejacrot.com
All photos © Christophe Jacrot

This entry was written by admin, posted on October 17, 2012 at 7:04 PM, filed under Abstract, Street photography and tagged , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Natural Phenomena; Awe-inspiring Time-lapse Video by Reid Gower

Well established video producer, filmmaker, and science enthusiast Reid Gower spent a good six months travelling the world making this stunning piece of video art. Even though Gower has a lot of experience in filmmaking, this was actually his first real time-lapse video, but the final result is still simply breathtaking.

Travelling to places like Alaska, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, California, and Turkey, Gower thought, “hey why not make a time-lapse video while we’re at it?”. At times travelling with just a DSLR and a tripod, basically anyone could do the same, but few have the eye and editing skills of Reid Gower.

Gower also used a fair amount of technical creativity. The (almost) outer space pictures for example, were shot with a GoPro camera mounted in a thermal lunch box that he sent up to the sky with a big balloon. He just added some hand warmers to prevent lens fogging in the rapidly changing temperature and humidity, and a GPS device to find the camera once it fell back to earth. Simple, low-budget, but extremely effective.

“Humans are part of the natural order. We’re risen apes that acquired language and learned to use tools. Skyscrapers and spacecraft may seem unnatural, but they’re just as much a part of the natural order as beaver dams and bird nests.”

The video was shot with a Nikon D300 that has an built-in intervalometer. Other cameras that were used were the GoPro Hero 2 we already mentioned, and a Canon EOS 5D mark II. For the amazing panning you can see in almost all the shots, he used two different techniques. Crop-zooming is when you make the panning in post production, without actually moving the camera while filming. Hyper-lapse, on the other hand, is basically moving the camera/tripod, and reframing each shot for an interesting effect.

Some still highlights:

Natural Phenomena - Timelapse video by Reid Gower

Natural Phenomena - Time-lapse video by Reid Gower

Natural Phenomena - Time-lapse video by Reid Gower

Natural Phenomena - Time-lapse video by Reid Gower

Natural Phenomena - Time-lapse video by Reid Gower

Natural Phenomena - Time-lapse video by Reid Gower

Sources: Vimeo & Reddit
All content © Reid Gower / VideoSapien

This entry was written by admin, posted on October 16, 2012 at 1:51 PM, filed under Timelapse, Videos and tagged , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Abstract Architecture by Thomas Hawk

These surreal and abstract architecture photos were taken in Houston, Texas during the summer of 2011 by self-proclaimed “photography factory” Thomas Hawk. His Flickr page consists of tens of thousands of photos, and the number is continuously growing. He’s also got a huge fan base, his Google+ page has over three million followers.

“I’m trying to publish a library of 1,000,000 finished, processed photographs before I die.”

These abstract shots are just a tiny slice of his Houston set that I happened to stumble upon. The set is part of an even larger collection called 100 largest American cities, where Hawk aims to capture photos in all of America’s 100 largest cities (by population). It’s an ongoing project, and so far he’s covered 32 of them.

Abstract Architecture in Houston Texas by Thomas Hawk

Abstract Architecture in Houston Texas by Thomas Hawk

Abstract Architecture in Houston Texas by Thomas Hawk

Abstract Architecture in Houston Texas by Thomas Hawk

Abstract Architecture in Houston Texas by Thomas Hawk

Abstract Architecture in Houston Texas by Thomas Hawk

Abstract Architecture in Houston Texas by Thomas Hawk

Source: Flickr
All photos © Thomas Hawk

This entry was written by admin, posted on October 7, 2012 at 10:33 PM, filed under Abstract, Architecture and tagged , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Mars from Above; Space Photography by Michael Benson

All the (well deserved) hype about the amazing Curiosity project lately has reincarnated my love for space photography, and especially planetary landscapes. These shots weren’t taken by Curiosity, however, but almost three years earlier by the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, on January 27th 2010.

The original photographs, courtesy of NASA, were taken at approximately 200 miles above the surface of Mars, and they were all originally black and white. Afterwards, multimedia artist Michael Benson gathered the raw data, of which he created high resolution images, and digitally added color to them. He also created large format prints of these photos, which he has shown in exhibitions and books. His next book Planetfall: New Solar System Visions was just published at the beginning of this month. It features beautiful large format color photographs created from various deep-space missions by NASA and the European Space Agency, digitally retouched and colored by Benson.

These amazing vertical panorama shots show us the beautiful and strange landscapes of our red neighbor planet. It brings us closer and gives us a more detailed view than most of the photos we’ve seen from that part of our solar system. What makes it even more interesting are those weird looking black spidery things at the bottom of the first photo. They don’t look like anything anyone’s ever seen before. Nobody really knows what they are, but they have been regularly captured by NASA’s cameras since 1998. Every spring (by the Martian calendar, that is) they appear on sand dunes like the ones in that photo, sometimes even over night. And then when winter comes, they disappear. Spooky? Maybe. Cool photography? Definitely.

Mars from Above Space Photography Panoramas by Michael Benson

Mars from Above Space Photography Panoramas by Michael Benson

Sources: NPR & New York Times
All photos © Michael Benson / NASA / JPL / University of Arizona / Kinetikon Pictures

This entry was written by admin, posted on October 6, 2012 at 11:40 PM, filed under Landscapes, Space and tagged , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.




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