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First Photograph Taken in Finland turns 170

This may look like something captured with Instagram on the newest smartphone, but it’s something a bit different indeed. It is the first photograph taken in Finland, ever. The photo dates back to the year 1842, and celebrated its 170th birthday last Saturday, November 3rd.

The photograph is a daguerreotype, one of the earliest photography techniques (check out the Wikipedia link for an interesting read). It was taken in Turku, which coincidentally also is Finland’s oldest city, though obviously not the only city at the time. The photographer was Henrik Cajander, a doctor by trade who lived on the very street the photo was taken.

The building in the picture was called the Nobel house, and it was located on the corner of Uudenmaankatu 8 (map). The beautiful building had just been finished when the photo was taken. It was later, after several stages of re-modelling and renovations, demolished by the City of Turku in 1961.

As you can see the photo isn’t exactly perfect, technically or aesthetically speaking, but it is a big part of the history in Finnish photography. Some might call the crooked composition an amateur mistake, but the photographer was, in the realest sense, an amateur at what he was doing.

First Photograph Taken in Finland ever by Henrik Cajander

As of right now, the city of Turku publicly displays a “life size enlargement” of the photograph above. It is located at the very spot where the building used to be.

Sources: Ilta-Sanomat & Turku.fi (both links in Finnish)

This entry was written by admin, posted on November 8, 2012 at 11:09 PM, filed under Architecture, Daguerreotype, Street photography and tagged , , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Hong Kong in the Rain by Christophe Jacrot

Where I live, as in most of the Northern Hemisphere, autumn has come. And it’s been raining for days now. But that doesn’t necessary mean it’s a bad or depressing thing. I remembered a beautiful rainy set of pictures I’d stumbled upon earlier this year and thought it would be appropriate for this wet, cold, and dark part of the year. It’s called Hong Kong in the rain by French photographer and filmmaker Christophe Jacrot.

Jacrot isn’t exactly known for his “postcard cliché landscapes”. Quite the contrary, he manages to capture the beauty in the roughest of conditions, when most of us would rather get wrapped up under a blanket with a hot cup of tea.

“I like the way rain, snow and ‘bad weather’ awaken a feeling of romantic fiction within me”

Hong Kong in the Rain, by Christophe Jacrot

Hong Kong in the Rain, by Christophe Jacrot

Hong Kong in the Rain, by Christophe Jacrot

Hong Kong in the Rain, by Christophe Jacrot

Hong Kong in the Rain, by Christophe Jacrot

Hong Kong in the Rain, by Christophe Jacrot

Hong Kong in the Rain, by Christophe Jacrot

Hong Kong in the Rain, by Christophe Jacrot

Source & more pictures: christophejacrot.com
All photos © Christophe Jacrot

This entry was written by admin, posted on October 17, 2012 at 7:04 PM, filed under Abstract, Street photography and tagged , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.



Faces of Addiction in Hunts Point, NYC

Faces of Addiction in Hunts Point, by Chris Arnade

Photographer Chris Arnade doesn’t just take pictures of people on the street. He gets close and comfortable with both the people and their surroundings, listen to life stories, dreams, burdens, and writes about it on his Flickr page in the most moving way. Most of the times he even returns later with a printed portrait and a warm blanket.

“I am not a journalist, I don’t verify, just listen.”

Banker by trade, Chris has been strolling around parts of New York City that people normally don’t visit. He’s been doing that for the past twenty years, and with a camera in his hand for the past five, not once feeling uncomfortable or fearing for his safety.

The subjects of these emotional portraits are real people, with real problems, living in a rough part of town. But once you get past the exterior image, you learn that there is a warm hearted, respectful, and welcoming human being behind almost every one of them, taking it day by day, just trying to get by.

The highly acclaimed Faces of Addiction is an ongoing project since 2010, and some times Arnade can spend up to months before even raising his camera, just getting to know the people and the world they live in. He’s an avid supporter of HPAC, Hunts Point Alliance for Children. You can help too.

“Often forgotten amidst the headlines of addiction and crime is that roughly 4,000 families live in Hunts Point, cut off from most of the resources New York City provides.”

Faces of Addiction in Hunts Point, by Chris Arnade

Faces of Addiction in Hunts Point, by Chris Arnade

Faces of Addiction in Hunts Point, by Chris Arnade

Faces of Addiction in Hunts Point, by Chris Arnade

Faces of Addiction in Hunts Point, by Chris Arnade

A photograph is only half the story, especially in this series, so I encourage everyone to take a good look at Chris Arnade’s Flickr galleries at the link below. Even though he claims not to be a journalist, the texts are very well written, and it gives you an insight to a part of the world you probably weren’t that familiar with. And it’s OK to shead a tear or two, yours truly did that too.

Sources: Flickr gallery & The Gothamist
All photos © Chris Arnade

This entry was written by admin, posted on September 16, 2012 at 9:53 PM, filed under Portraits, Street photography and tagged , . Leave a comment or view the discussion at the permalink and follow any comments with the RSS feed for this post.




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